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Healing Power of Mourning

Romans 12:15b…Mourn with those mourn


A heaviness weighs over our nation like a dark overhanging cloud of impending storms. We see

the deep division among the racial fault lines; political mayhem invades our living rooms every

night; endless groups of people galvanized by specific hurt, wounds or certain values that are

gathering from outside the edges of societal norms. The LGBT community clamoring for their

causes; transgender issues clumsily breaking into our consciousness. Demanding a space to

exist and the right to use whatever bathroom they choose. Wars and rumors of wars fill the

airwaves. Large segments of the church of Jesus Christ deeply divided among political

affiliations choosing sides and losing their prophetic voices in the process. Yet the hope of the

world is wrapped up into the word called reconciliation. However it seems that mourning

historically precedes the journey of reconciliation. Romans 12:15b says to mourn with those

mourn. The way to heal hurts, sadness and disappointments is to lament with those who

lament. Logic and reason cannot heal emotional pain it takes empathy and emotions to get into

the world of broken people and sit with them in that pain and share it with them so they no

longer feel alone.

God identified a problem before sin, when He said in Genesis 2:18 “It was not good for man to

be alone” He did not design man to be alone and his solution was not Himself but another

human being called Eve. We were created to remove the aloneness of each other and yet we

see that we are altogether yet alone. The church that was mandated to break down all walls of

separation and including people in a community of belonging has consistently erected walls of

division; even within its own house. Mourning is not despair or whining. It is not a cry into the

darkness. It is a cry directed first to God. It is the cry of those who see the truth of the world’s

deep wounds and the cost of seeking peace. It is the cry of those who are deeply disturbed by

the way things are. The path of reconciliation is rooted in the practice of mourning. Let’s step

back from our quick fixes, superficial anecdotes and take a seat by our brother and sister. Let’s

just sit with them; put aside your intellectual and logical answers and just mourn with them

awhile. Mourn with the refugees who has lost all; mourn with your gay friends, the loss of love

and family. Mourn with your African brother and sister whose history here in America did not

sail in on the Mayflower but on a ship ironically called “Jesus of Lebeck”, the first British slave

ship to land in America. Their history began with unimaginable pain and humiliation. Mourn

with the Mexican immigrant who left wife and kids to find work so he can feed them and clothe

them. As you mourn with them you will begin to mourn for yourself for in their pain you will see

your own brokenness. You will see that their pain is your pain and that sharing our pain can

become a source of healing. Then and only then are you truly ready to carry this gift of

reconciliation to the world.

GLOCALNET’S INCREDIBLE 2016

 

We are off to a strong start for 2017!  We are speaking, training and convening from Washington, D.C., to Hanoi, Vietnam, and even Lahore, Pakistan!  We will be all over the U.S. and the world this year.  We are training government leaders, imams, pastors, mentoring emerging pastors and connecting with religious leaders of other faiths to build bridges.  We are working with governments and government leaders globally defining what it looks like to engage in the public square in a new era.  We are deeply involved in religious freedom issues and religious persecution in some of the harder places of the world.  We are working on racial reconciliation in some very new ways that we’ll be writing about later.  

 

Last year Bob Roberts spoke at many events from church planting conferences, to being invite to being a part of the Marrakesh Declaration with Shaykh Bin Bayyah that protects the rights of religious minorities in Muslim majority nations.  He spoke at churches, mosques, government gatherings, the Newseum and even to 20,000 Muslim young people in Toronto, Canada.  Articles about our work were written in many national newspapers, here in the U.S., the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, the Dallas Morning News, the Christian Science Monitor, The Washington Post, Christianity Today, In-Touch Magazine, Christian Post, Huffington Post, and many others.  

 

Glocalnet’s passion is summed up in it’s vision statement. “We relentlessly pursue peace and reconciliation among all peoples in all places for all things.”

 

Here is a brief summary of 2016:

Glocalnet Family of Churches

Glocalnet consist of a family of churches that carry the same DNA and vision to be a light in this world and to engage our cities and the world to be peacemakers and reconcilers. We have 7 churches that gather yearly for community, sharing and learning from each other. We also support each other in living out our three most cherished values which are engaging our local communities, especially among the poor and marginalized, engage hard parts of the world together and help each others establish communities of faith that make a difference both locally and globally. Our goal is to keep increasing the family by developing leaders who buy into Glocalnet’s vision and are committed to living out our three main values.

 

Church Planting & Church Planting Centers

Glocalnet church multiplication is core to our DNA and moves us forward in accomplishing the above vision. It’s going to take a different kind of church to engage the city and world in this 21st century that goes far beyond what the music and worship service is.  We train and equip our churches to multiply communities of faith with the same vision and values. We established 2 church planting centers in local churches in 2016. Our Glocalnet family trained over 40 church planters to go and establish communities of faith that bring about peace and reconciliation both locally and globally. The key to creating and sustaining this movement is multiplication, therefore we are intentional about placing the expectation and the training in every leader of Glocalnet.

 

Multi-Faith Retreats

We have designed a retreat that brings together evangelical pastors and muslim Imams together for three days. These retreats are designed to break down walls of fear and suspicions and get to know each other as humans. The essence of these gatherings is to have transparent and honest conversation with each other about difficult issues. However it does not stop there, these leaders make a commitment to build ongoing relationships with each other and their constituencies and to work together in their cities for the common good and to protect each other from religious persecution.   Glocalnet gathered for two such retreats in 2016. We did one in Phoenix with 12 pastors and 12 imams and one in Washington DC hosted by the Turkish government. These two groups continue to meet quarterly. We see walls of suspicions come down and new relationships formed after these retreats. Our goal is to build upon these relationships and create a network of religious leaders across cities and the nation who will be there to respond in emergency situations.

 

 

Global Collaboration Communities (GCC)

Glocalnet brings together apostolic leaders globally every year to build relationships and to learn from the global church.  In 2016 we met in India hosted by an exceptional leader who has a movement in that country. 20 global leaders came together to build relationship and to learn from each other, share best practices in area of engaging the public square, pluralism and church planting. The takeaways were incredible as we leveraged relationships, knowledge and learning from each other. There were visit to sikh temples, meetings with religious and government leaders to learn about religious freedom issues and how the church can play a role in creating better citizens that help build great nations.

 

Nation & City Engagement

The way churches engage the world is changing radically.  It’s a new world, the whole world is connected.  In the past global and city engagement was about doing religious stuff in a geographical context.  Today, the church must be presently bringing value to a city and nation beyond just a worship service on Sunday.  How we make disciples and engage the domains of society are critical.  That leads to natural conversations about faith and life.  We continue to help churches and people engage through the natural infrastructure of society in places that would be considered difficult for most.  

 

Hosted Mosaic Conference

Glocalnet in partnership with Northwood Church hosted Mosaic’s multi-ethnic conference. About 1200 multi-ethnic leaders from across the nation came to celebrate and champion this vision, and challenge the American Church to get beyond systemic segregation to advance a credible gospel witness in an increasingly diverse and cynical society. To bring peace and reconciliation among the races in our country.

 

So as you can see these are just small glances at the work Glocalnet did in 2016. We are committed to being relentless peacemakers and work tirelessly to move humanity beyond tolerance to reconciliation and celebration of each other.

HOW TO GET HUNDREDS OF MUSLIMS TO YOUR WORSHIP SERVICE ON SUNDAY

(Skip to 16:10 to see the interview with Imam Zia)

 

The church I pastor, NorthWood, celebrated MLK Day not just last Monday but Sunday as well.  We are in a series called ANXIETY in which we are looking at how we deal with it as people.  On January 15, we looked at how we deal with anxiety when community issues arise.  We had a guest band that was awesome, we had ethnic food tables from all over the world, and we had Muslims, Jews, Buddhist, and even an Atheist who came out of curiosity over an “evangelical church that would invite all those people to come together.”

I preached on standing together out of Romans 12 and in the sermon even brought up a friend from a mosque in Irving, Imam Zia.  He shared what Muslims believe and I explained what we believe about the birth, death, burial, resurrection of Jesus, and how to accept him as Lord and Savior.  We had hundreds of Muslims with us.  I LOVE preaching to people of other religions about Jesus – kinda what Paul did.

Paul would be shocked at what he would find in American Christianity with it’s isolationism and tribalism.  Paul was a frequent speaker at synagogues, other religious temples, philosophy gatherings, universities, markets, and countless other public square gatherings.  As a matter of fact, all of Paul’s evangelism was in the public square generally being asked to speak at their request.  Frankly, I get asked to speak at many non-Christian and other religious events and I’ve come to love it.  You’ve not preached until you’ve preached to a packed house of people where you are the only Christian!  It’s like skiing on the black slopes.  A little scary at first, but then – wow it’s incredible!

The reality is, any evangelical pastor, in any city in America can do what I do.  The truth is, it would be easy.  The reason is that so few evangelical pastors reach out intentionally to people of other religions, and most of those people of other religions as minorities want a relationship with us.    Keep in mind the early church didn’t grow through sheep swapping, better music, celebrity pastors, or backslidden Baptist and Methodist but from people from many other religions who loved the message of Jesus.

How do you do it this?  The clip above of the Sunday service illustrates this:

  1. Intentionally be friends with people of other religions.  If you’re an American evangelical pastor you are the majority – not the minority.  THEY DON’T BITE!  I’ve yet to get a bad reception from someone of another religion that you try to just be their friend.  Ask to go drink coffee, probably tea is better, or eat a meal or just hang out.  ALL THE APOSTLES DID THIS!!!  That’s how the Gospel spread to so many nations. My wife is in a cooking club with Muslims and Jews.  There are so many ways to build friendships.  Zia and I have been friends for years.  All good things come out of relationships.
  1. Visit their place of worship.  They will let you.  As a matter of fact it shows honor and respect that you would do that.  It would be a great education experience for you.  Paul did this – don’t let other Christians who live by fear and isolationism leading to judgmentalism keep you away.  It gives you chance to speak intelligently to them and to your members about what you believe.
  1. Let them share their view!  Paul did this as well.  Leave your rhetoric at home, have a conversation with people.  If the strength of our faith is keeping other faiths away or not allowing other faiths to speak – we must have a very small view of the power of the Gospel and of the Trinity.  Be gracious, listen, ask questions, be kind.
  1. When you’re asked to speak, smile a lot.  Take off your preacher face and your oratory.  Don’t let others tell you everything you need to say.  Let the Spirit guide you.  Be kind.  Self-depreciating humor helps.  Take a long term approach to what you say and do.
  1. State what you believe but be kind about it.  Share where you disagree but don’t disparage the other person.  Everyone talks about look at all the commonalities, frankly I believe the strength is in how much we disagree but how well as followers of Jesus we can still be friends with others.  As a friend of mine says, “Lift up Jesus!”  You don’t have to trash others, just tell your story and the story of Jesus.
  1. Eat a meal together and keep hanging out.  You don’t know what God might do with building relationships.  I’m sorry to say I used to see other religious clerics as obstacles to overcome in order to engage with others – I’ve come to see them as the most important people I should be friends with.  We have access to masses that can lead to all kinds of things in terms of standing up for one another, etc.
  1. Work together for religious freedom.  The whole world is connected.  What you do here affects there.  I get to help persecuted Christians around the world, and other religious minorities, because of my credibility with Muslims here in America.  Would to God, we American Christians and especially evangelical pastors would realize that when you speak and spout hate, you make it incredibly hard for believers around the world.  But, many pastors in America have been told this and still don’t control their tongues.  I guess they don’t really care about believers around the world that much as long as things are ok with them.

People talk a lot about going back to the early church – this is how it started.  They didn’t have revival meetings, seminars, books, not even a Bible – just a few letters passed around.  But they did have the Holy Spirit and Love.  The formula has not changed – but we have.  It still works.

For A Time, Such As This

by Kevin C. Brown
Founder, Lead Pastor of The Perfecting Church, Sewell, NJ

Guest Blogger

The Glocal Family of Churches is comprised of churches from as far North as Toronto and as far South as Houston, TX.  Our churches are as different as these two cities themselves, led by pastors from different ethnic, cultural, socio-economic and denominational backgrounds.  But each of us have attended a church planting cohort created by Bob Roberts, the founder of Glocal.net, and we have embraced the commitment to relate together as family; establish church planting centers in our churches; mobilize our members to use their jobs and passions to serve the most vulnerable in our cities; and to mobilize our members to make a long-term commitment to serve as a church in a challenging part of the world.  These commitments, along with a commitment to see the Kingdom of God become a tangible reality in the domains of society in our respective cities, have given very different churches, led by very different pastors, in very different parts of the country — the same spiritual DNA. Read more

MORE INFORMATION & LESS KNOWLEDGE

I was at a meeting in Doha a while back on things that are happening globally with world leaders from many domains and disciplines.  It was truly an incredible meeting.  It wasn’t a huge conference, a couple of hundred people and was kept small on purpose.  I’ve actually come to love gatherings like this more than speaking to thousands of people.  Most of the time those big gatherings are pep rallies or marketing in disguise!  Smaller groups of thinkers and practitioners gathering and learning from one another is always more impactful.  There were some panels in 3 or 4 main sessions then we would break into groups and ask questions, challenge each other & debate.  It would get tense but it was really a lot of fun – you could pretty much share whatever you wanted – it was a safe place.  I was one of only about 3 evangelicals there so man were we bombarded trying to explain all of the “nuts” in our movement.  Funny how we want to define an entire group of people by a few nuts no matter what tribe! Read more

SAME SUBJECTS DIFFERENT CONVERSATIONS – HOW THE GLOBAL CHURCHES & PASTORS THINK

 

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I have been amazed at how similar and at the same time different the conversations are between global pastors and U.S. pastors.  These “little” differences I’ve come to believe, make all the difference in the world.  I’ll be writing about some of them later but for now, here’s some of the shifts in they talk is what I’ve observed.  We long for many of the same things, but our mindset or structures prevent us.

First, we talk a lot about church planting and church planting movements.  They talk obsessively about the Kingdom of God and nations a lot.  They are like Dallas Willard on steroids but not in a primarily theological sense but a practical sense.  Their kingdom view and passion to see their nation and surrounding nations reached, drives all other activities as in church planting, disciple making, leadership development  etc.

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LESSONS FROM THE EAST RELEASES TODAY

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God has truly blessed my life in so many ways – but one of the greatest is allowing me to get to know global pastors that are movement makers.  Eddy Leo, Oscar Muiri, Joseph Maisha, Joshua Vivyakumar, Sean Bau, Jossy Chacko, Terry Virgo, Dion Rober, Robert Lay, and so so many others.

These men are different from most pastors I know here in the U.S., myself included.    They embody not just growth in terms of tens and hundreds of thousands if not millions – but they do it not by PR, marketing, business management – but real moves of God.  They are not full of themselves, they are humble men.  They are not the loud people at a pastors gathering if you didn’t know who they were you might think it’s a lucky global pastor who someone paid their way to come to an event – but you’d be very mistaken.  Yet, they struggle – but not like us.  Family issues, financial issues, societal issues, war, persecution, hardships that we can’t imagine.  Even last week as I was hearing from leaders in Pakistan they were sad but still victorious looking for how God would use the tragedy they were all affected by.  I remember one pastor once saying “You guys have great insurance and medical care” we have to learn to “call on the Lord – he’s all we’ve got”.

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LESSONS FROM PAKISTAN

 

I just returned from a week in Pakistan hanging out with several friends there and looking at how we can work together.  The U.S. and Pakistan frankly have some things in common that if we can work together, helps all of us.  In the U.S. we are the majority as Christians and Muslims are the minority – it’s reversed in Pakistan.  We are both passionate about our faith and both are concerned about our minorities in the other country.  Working together globally and locally is our best bet of bringing understanding to each other and protection for our minority.  In the U.S. there is a dangerous and serious disconnect between how we treat Muslims here and the implications it has on Christians globally.

Christians who believe in the Great Commission, and Muslims who believe in Dawa can practice it right at home by how they treat religious minorities from around the world who are around them.  Stated another way, it’s in the best interest of our faith to treat religious minorities well around us, if we want our religious minorities treated well globally.  It does no good to send people around the world only for our western religious mouths to unnecessarily put them at risk or impede their work by what is seen as religious colonialism and western expansion of culture and ideology.

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LIVING WITH MUSLIMS IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

I need to blog. I don’t know how to find the time. I’m learning so much, experiencing so much, seeing so much change take place right before my eyes. I feel like I’m caught up in a whirlwind of change processing it all as fast as I can. I’ll be blogging soon about it – maybe. The past three months have been some of the greatest learning and events of my life. From being in Vietnam and receiving the Friendship Metal and being asked to do some things to having been in Morocco last week at the “Marrakech Declaration” and being asked to address the room of 300 world leaders. Now packing my bags to head to another part of the world to speak in mosques, churches, and other places. Read more

21ST CENTURY LEADERSHIP FOR EVERY PASTOR IMAM RABBI PRIEST RELIGIOUS LEADER

By: Bob Roberts, Jr.

There is not a more important role in the 21st century for peace and harmony in our world than that of the religious cleric. Peace or war is going to be driven, endorsed, promoted, justified by clerics to the masses more than any one entire group in the world. Religious leaders in the past, have felt attacked by academics, globalist, scientist, secularist, and diplomats because religion was supposed to go away – but it didn’t. Clerics of all faiths were viewed as ignorant, uneducated, simpletons and relics from another era. The world has discovered religion isn’t dead, it’s alive, and not just alive but thriving.

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