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Players, Lovers, & Learners by Nic Burleson

In this blog, Pastor Nic Burleson shares three really big lessons Timber Ridge Church has learned through global engagement in Vietnam.  This is what can happen to you and your church with intentional and ongoing investment in the world.

We started Timber Ridge back in 2011 and from the very beginning our church has been involved in global engagement, specifically in Vietnam. We’ve mobilized people from our local community to serve in various domains, such as education, medicine & agriculture. Along the way, we’ve learned some great lessons that have been a huge benefit to us as a church. Here are the top 3 takeaways we’ve learned as we’ve engaged globally:

#1: Everyone has a seat at the table. 

When a church releases its members to use their careers, jobs & education through the domains of society, it’s a game changer. This means that ministry and global engagement are no longer the sole responsibility of vocational pastors or missionaries, but that every person in the church has skills and knowledge that can be used to impact and serve others in the world. Through engaging in domains as we serve in Vietnam, the people of our church have realized that everyone can be used in God’s Kingdom to make an impact simply by using the trades, skills & vocations God has given them. That means that everyone in the church has a seat at the table when it comes to working toward good in our world and impact in our community.

#2: Love has no borders.

Our world is divided in so many ways. Borders. Languages. Religions. Political ideologies. One thing that transcends every border and every language is the outward practice of truly loving others. When we started to work in the mountains of north Vietnam, one of our biggest concerns were how we would make an impact with the existing language barrier. But we quickly realized that love is a language all its own. As we have learned to serve others and genuinely love people who are different from us – but no less created in the beauty and image of God – we’ve seen that love isn’t confined by borders or boundaries. And that’s not only impacted how our church serves globally, but has affected how we serve and love our own local community as well.

#3: There are lessons to be learned.

Far too many times, it seems that the only posture the Western Church has taken in regards to the rest of the world is the posture of teacher. But what we’ve experienced at Timber Ridge is that there are countless lessons to be learned from our friends all around the world if we’ll simply take the posture of the learner. One of the things that our church has become known for is hospitality. We didn’t discover that on our own. We learned it from our friends in Vietnam. The Vietnamese people are some of the most welcoming, hospitable people I’ve ever encountered. And as we learned what it meant to truly welcome and embrace strangers and guests, it’s had a huge impact on the culture and influence our church has had in our local community.

Global engagement isn’t a good idea or program for the church. It’s what Jesus has called his disciples to do. And as we engage globally, not only do we show and share the gospel of the Kingdom of God, we grow in that gospel as well. So get out there…it’s a beautiful world that we get to learn from!

The Most Powerful Form of Discipleship

SPIRITUAL FATHERING & MOTHERING

In my last blog I spoke of discipleship and what it looks like to produce a really mature follower of Jesus.  There were three things I addressed in that blog that are very present in spiritual fathering and mothering.  1) Parenting is about providing a model of life that others can imitate. 2) Being present IS discipleship. 3) Finally, and this is so important – not merely telling a young disciple what to do, but teaching them to think.  For spiritual fathering and mothering as discipleship to occur there are several things that have to happen.

First, there must be a deep relational connection to the person that you are pouring into.  It has to work both ways for it to work.  It isn’t enough that the spiritual “parent” is willing to pour into a young Jesus follower, the follower must be willing to receive.  The great tragedy is that there is an “orphan” spirit in the church today.  It’s very individualistic and autocratic.  Sadly, ministry has become a place of self and personal significance and self-fulfillment more than it is about security as a child of God and extending his glory and not our own.  We come into spiritual parenting generally by brokenness or a deep desire of intimacy with God.  We see that intimacy in someone else filled with a credible walk with God in life.

Second, the goal of a spiritual parent isn’t a new way to build your own kingdom, it’s the biblical way of deploying people in God’s Kingdom and releasing them.  You see in biological families the challenge some parents have is letting go of their children.  They want them to fulfill their own unfulfilled desires and dreams.  This is never healthy.  Conversations with grown children and directives for toddlers and adolescents are very different.  This discipleship that I write about is that which is done with grown children.  I have several spiritual fathers – I go to get their advice, counsel, and prayer.  I don’t always go to get their approval.  I’m sad because many of my spiritual fathers are in their 70’s and 80’s now and they won’t be around forever.  Each one of them give me something different.  We cannot expect our spiritual fathers to be everything for us – they can only be what they are and what God has given them.  It involves listening and understanding the follower of Jesus – not making them in your image.  They have a divine destiny – your goal is not to make them into your image but help them grow in the image of Jesus.

Third, every child needs a father and a mother.  A single parent child needs aunts, uncles, grandparents, and close family friends to help fill in those gaps when both parents are not present.  Many would balk at this but I believe it’s psychologically core to why the Catholic Church views Mary as it does.  We all need a father, and we all need a mother.  I believe the father/mother characteristics are present not in merely male and female designations but in the Trinity.  When you read about the Holy Spirit, and the God of all comfort, the Spirit living in us, and so many other metaphors – as well as Jesus and how he loves you cannot escape it.  Paul writes clearly neither male nor female.  Sometimes I need to hear my mom’s voice.  If all we ever hear is the masculine side of God, we will wind up lop-sided.

Fourth, spiritual parenting involves spiritual sons and daughters being with you in your context so they can watch you.  All of us have things we do effectively without thinking, these actions are second nature to us – but not to others.  I read a lot of books, but I’m not an academic.  I have to put my hands on something and do it to understand it.  So much of my learning has been reverse engineering.  I would start doing something, it would work enough that I knew I was on to something – then I read like crazy.  Having your spiritual children present in all kinds of circumstances teaches them all kinds of things.

Fifth, spiritual fathering and mothering means giving young followers some responsibility and watching them.  Help them do it – allow for them to mess up.  Nothing, and I mean nothing – gives me joy like watching my spiritual children teach, lead, execute things that they’ve seen in me.  Recently, I was at various meetings where several of  the young men I disciple were speaking – I heard so much at what I’ve taught them it simply freaked me out.  I realized that what I taught them had gone deep inside of them and had became a part of them as it had me.  I listened to one talk about church planting, another at a secular event on the public square, another at a multi-faith event – I was simply blown away.  I hadn’t realized how much I had shared they had taken hold of.  It was perhaps the happiest day of my ministry.  I don’t worry what happens when I’m gone.  They’ll take it all to a new level before I’m gone and I’m truly blessed!

Finally, spiritual parenting involves affirming and correcting without stifling.  People are desperate for affirmation.  They don’t always get it from their fathers and mothers.  A little affirmation publicly – but all correction privately.  When something is done or said publicly it sometimes demands a public response.  I’ve learned to say, “I love you but I disagree here, and this is why . . .”  I have been corrected publicly and that isn’t always fun.  But sometimes, it’s good for all of us as long as it’s done in a positive manner.

There is one very serious note of caution on spiritual fathering . . . but I’ll save that for another blog! 

NOT BETTER … DIFFERENT by Kevin Cox

My wife, Kathy, and I have had the privilege of starting two churches. The first was in the Seattle area. With no assessment, no training, no coaching, and a little funding, we did the only thing we knew to do: knock on doors and send out mailers.  Unbelievably, it worked! We launched with a solid attendance, especially for the Pacific Northwest. We grew in spite of me and my lack of leadership skills. After 9 ½ years we had developed a reputation for loving on the children of our community. However, as I look back so many of our leadership conversations centered around how we could make the Sunday morning experience “better.” The prevailing thought for us, and for most churches in the early 2000’s was, “If we can just make Sunday morning better, people will want to attend.” And truthfully, for many churches, this mode of thinking bore fruit. We sought better performances on stage from the band. Better facilities. Better sermons. Better lighting. Better projectors and screens. Better children’s ministry. We were so worried about making Sunday morning better, mainly to keep up with the church down the street that was making their Sunday morning experience better, that we had forgotten the mission of Jesus to go make disciples capable of changing the world. The Father in his grace blessed our effort, but something seemed amiss.

After our tenure was over in Seattle, I vividly remember driving over the Cascade Mountains with our four kids in tow and turning to Kathy and saying, “We are going to do it differently this time.” I had no idea then the depth of that statement. We started Vista Church with a less than stellar grand opening. In fact, in the eyes of the church planting world it was horrendous. But in our eyes, that was irrelevant. “Butts in the seats” was not our primary goal…the kingdom of God was. We were not starting a better church in our new community. We were starting a different kind of church and the last 10 years have been the ride of our lives! What does this ‘different’ kind of church look like?

There are six characteristics that stand out:

1. Disproportionate influence

We do not ask the question, “How is my church?” Instead, we ask the question, “How is my city?” Since we desire to see our cities blessed, we often collaborate with city leaders and organizations leading to influence in our cities that far exceeds the size of our churches.

2. Start churches for the world

When you start with the world in mind, your church plant will be shaped by the world. And, when you start your church for the world, you will view your church plant as a sending base that affects the world rather than an isolated congregation in a single community.

3. New DNA 

Kingdom, Disciple, Society, Church (KDSC). Cut us and this is what we bleed. This is FAMILY DNA. Like a magnet, this DNA draws church planters and the Family is growing!

4. Public Square

As Paul engaged the city of Athens, we teach church planters how to engage kings, world leaders, city leaders, philosophers, business people and influencers by speaking ‘one message’ both publicly and privately.

5. Multiethnic

Jesus said, “…on earth as it is in heaven.” If we believe that all ethnicities inhabit heaven, then why should the church not look like that now? If we want to have a voice in the racial division of our country, the multiethnic church is the key.

6. Multifaith

Rather than denigrating other religions, we intentionally seek to befriend them for the purpose of building bridges of peace. Unlike the interfaith efforts of the past where “all roads lead to heaven” was the underlying premise, we have honest conversation based on the fact that we disagree theologically but the best of our religions compels us to work together for the betterment of our cities.

As I write this, I am about to participate in day 2 of a pastor/imam retreat in Ft. Worth, TX where we will make plans for our congregations to work together on a project that serves ‘the least’ in our respective cities. Last week I attended Family Gathering where we challenged our Family with a vision for planting 32 GlocalNet church planting centers around the United States and Canada in the next 10 years. I also received a text from the head football coach at our local high school if I would be willing to lead his team in a devotion before their first playoff game this week. This the different church we envisioned. Do we want to offer our best on Sunday mornings? You bet! But we want to offer our best on Sunday mornings to inspire and equip people for ministry. That’s different. If you are looking to plant a different kind of church, then check us out at www.releaseinitiative.com. We would love for you to be a part of the family! It will be the ride of your life!

My Most Important Discipleship Lessons

There is so much about discipleship that I don’t know.  There is a lot I learned that was wrong.  There was a lot I stumbled into that was right.  I went from a discipleship that focused on learn, grow, and go – to hear and obey.   Had the early church made learn, grow, and go disciples it never would have gotten off the ground because at what point did you know enough?  When were you ready to leave?  Who determined all of that?  But, if discipleship is hear and obey, the primary focus is not what I know but instead my ability to hear God’s voice and then follow it.  The most important thing I’m now going to teach someone isn’t a book study, doctrine series, or information – but it’s how to hear God’s voice.  To do that I have to know how to pray, how to hear God speak when I’m reading his word, how to live in community and hear God speak through other disciples.  Spiritual disciplines are everything.  This discipleship goes through a very different door and produces a very different disciple.  It’s a lot easier to read a book and jump through hoops than it is hear God’s voice and follow it. 

First, I’m always being discipled. 

Many people feel bad that no one ever “discipled” them – but I’m not sure this is as true as it sounds.  One of my Spiritual Fathers, Doug Coe, said that we first have to disciple ourselves.  What he meant by that is that we have to love Jesus so much that we do whatever he says.  No amount of classes or courses can make us do that.  He was right.  Every time I’m in a worship service, I’m being discipled.  Every time I’m listening to someone teach I’m being discipled.  Every time I’m following the Holy Spirit I’m being discipled.  Every time I’m in a prayer meeting I’m being discipled.  For the follower of Jesus all of life is discipleship.  When I’m reading a biography on Washington to learn how he led – Washington is discipling me.  When I’m reading Fareed Zacharias to understand the world, he’s discipling me.  When I read a Rabbi Jonathan Sacks book on relating to other religions – he’s discipling me.  YES, non-Chrisitans can disciple us, too, and often even better than Christians.  When I watch someone serve Jesus like Dan Dubois or Bryan Stockton who worked beside me at Steve Bezner’s church after Hurricane Harvey or watch them at an inner-city festival for poor children  – I’m being discipled by those that I would disciple.  If you see life as one big discipleship opportunity you’ll grow a lot more.  If you see it as a single person pouring into you, you’ll be a spiritual shrimp.  YES, it’s great to have some one on one, but it isn’t the end of the world.  After all, the goal of discipleship is to be a self-feeder that follows Jesus.

Second, the best disciplers in my life don’t give me information but provide me a model. 

A man named Jim Hylton has impacted my life profoundly.  He’s in his 80’s.  Yes, he’s taught me a lot of stuff – but it’s his model of life that has taught me the most.  I’m watching him, a strong follower of Jesus, so I can know how to grow old in grace and bless others.  He models how to stay tender as you get older.  He’s not perfect – he has his flaws and I’ve seen them.  I’m not looking for someone to be Jesus, I’m looking for someone to let Jesus be Jesus in them in spite of their faults. 

Third, the best disciplers walk through tough times with you. 

They listen, they pray, they challenge you, they love you regardless.  Who ever thinks of discipleship as presence?  But you can’t be to others  what someone hasn’t first been to you.  Everyone hurts, everyone hits walls, everyone has struggles, everyone wants to hang it up at times – Jim has sat patiently with me at times and listened to me and loved me.  I’m often asked how did I handle the stress and not give up from taking a white church and transitioning it to multi-ethnic and also a church that has reached deep into other religions to build bridges.  We love everybody at Northwood and that makes for some challenging things at times.  Jim is one of those key reasons I haven’t quit.  I told him one day “maybe I just need to get out of the way” and let someone else do this.  He said “Bob, I want to ask you a question Jesus asked.”  Okay Jim.  “Bob, will you leave me too.”  That question convicted me and bought me another six months!  It took another conversation to make it another 6 months! 

Fourth, the best disciplers make you think for yourself and cause you to learn for yourself. 

Jim has never taken me through a book study – but he’s told me about this book or that book that I’ve read that has caused us to have some deep conversations.  I love the fact he doesn’t just read “religious” books but many kinds of books be they science, psychology, or philosophy.  If he was just teaching me “his” stuff then my growth would be limited to him – but he models learning which enables me to travel my own unique paths of learning and growth.

Fifth, the most important discipleship lesson I can provide is . . . . well, I’ve said enough – I’ll save that for another blog – but it’s really really really BIG!   

START FOR THE WORLD

Recently, one of the churches in our family of churches, took center stage in the natural disaster of Hurricane Harvey. Houston Northwest Church and its pastor, Steve Bezner, found themselves facing a legacy-defining moment: do they focus their energies on their building that had been flooded and the people within their church or do they turn their attention to the neighborhoods surrounding their building and the thousands of people hopelessly watching the floodwaters inundate their homes, destroying all of their earthly belongings? For five years Steve had been exhorting his 40-year old congregation to engage and serve and love the people of northwest Houston regardless of their race or religion. So, when the God-moment arrived in Harvey, there was no decision to be made. Houston Northwest would don their #WELOVEHOU t-shirts and head to the neighborhoods. As a result of their response, they have raised over $400,000 to help in relief, mudded out hundreds of homes, provided essentials to thousands, Steve has been on local television and Headline News, established a partnership with WorldVision, and last but certainly not least, received several shout outs through Twitter from none other than Beth Moore herself!

Why would Steve lead his church to begin with serving its community? Because he has taught his church the four values of our family of churches: Kingdom, Disciple, Society, Church. It is these four values that we instill in our church planters through our Release training for church planters with the hope that they will start right—that they will start a church for the world.

Without divulging too much from our Release training, what do we mean when we desire to start a church for the world and not just for a community? Here are a few thoughts:

Starting a church for the world means serving the poor around us.

This was Jesus’ calling. It is a Kingdom calling. It is our calling.

17 And the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was given to him. He unrolled the scroll and found the place where it was written, 18 “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed, 19 to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.” Luke 4:17-19 (ESV)

Starting a church for the world means planting churches locally and globally at the same time.

However, to accomplish this, planting methodologies and approaches need to be driven from the field—not from the West! Frankly, we have more to learn from the church in the East than they do from us in the West. The popular statistic is that only 4% of churches in the US ever help start another church. We challenge our church planters through our Release training to help another church start within their first 12 months of existence.

Starting a church for the world means working in a “hard place” in the world.

We challenge our church planters to go where no one else dares to go. We train them to go to a “hard place” in the world and make a long-term transformational commitment to that place in the world until that specific place also becomes a sending place. It will take courage and wisdom to engage in hard places, but we will never fulfill the Great Commission if we don’t.

We fully recognize that this type of church planter training is not for everyone. But, if it is speaking your language, then you have two options. One, join us November 8-9, 2017 for our first-ever GlocalNet Family Gathering. At this gathering, you will learn in greater detail why starting churches for the world is such an integral part of who we are as a family of churches. You can register here:  GlocalNet Family Gathering Registration. We would love to have you join us. Or, join us at our next Release training near you. You can find out the one nearest you here:  Release Initiative.

You may never have to lead a relief effort after a hurricane, but if you start a church that serves the poor, multiplies churches and engages in a hard place in the world, you will find yourself on the adventure of a lifetime. Oh, by the way, you will not be doing this alone. You will have a family beside you, so go start a church for the world!

 

GlocalNet Gathering – You’re Invited!

From NorthWood Church and GlocalNet, over 200 churches have been planted.  If you count in other ministries that have been birthed and leaders that have been equipped and sent, we couldn’t begin to count the number of people that are out there walking around with Glocal DNA.  After that,  you could try to count the churches, ministries and disciples that have come from each of those churches and leaders and it just becomes exponential.  It’s quite a big family!

In a little over a month, we are calling the family to come together.  We want to hear the stories of what God is doing around the world. We want to learn about the hard fought victories, the miraculous catches of fish, and the heart-wrenching defeats of these adventures.  We want to think deeply and creatively about loving God and loving people. We want to gather to worship God with great passion. We want to pray together believing for one another. We want to encourage and fuel each other for the next season. We want to hear loving truth and guidance from God. We want to courageously obey Him, together.  As you can see, we’re expecting so, so much from this little family gathering.

So, if you are part of the family, a part of the extended family or a friend of the family…..YOU’RE INVITED! If you are looking for a family, you feel alone, you need some brothers and sisters, YOU”RE INVITED!  If you are looking for a paradigm shift or a change of wineskins…..YOU’RE INVITED!  If you just want to get to know some great people and learn some cool stuff….Yep, we welcome you, as well.  We’d love to see you.  Sign up below!

Click on the 2017 GlocalNet Family Gathering banner below to get more details and to register.

 

Elements of Movements

What a man does in life becomes history, but what he puts into motion becomes his legacy – Paul Cole

Here’s a question for you, “Are you creating history or making a movement?”

The word movement comes from the latin movere which means to move or set in motion. It speaks of something that is bigger and will probably take a few generations to see it’s fruition. Nevertheless, some leaders give themselves to such tasks with all their might. They care not who gets the credit, their only goal is to initiate it knowing that they may never see it to completion. They are moved by the prospect of changing the world for the better. The irony is that nobody creates a movement, they simply just lay the groundwork for one.

Here are some of the elements you will find in that groundwork that are vital in creating movements.

Movements are not about self-interest but are about what is right and wrong. Self-interest does not allow for long term thinking because it is only motivated by that which the leader can control or by what gives them credit. Some leaders are driven by small tasks they can complete in their life time in order to get the credit and accolades that short term achievements produce.

Movements always begin with the minorities. It is not the size of group that determines movements but it’s the commitment of the few involved. All you need is a committed and motivated minority in order to begin. When God wants to start a movement he always begins with a small minority or someone who has been discarded or rejected by society–someone that fits into the misfit category but possess the raw material of a nation’s future. The stone that the builders rejected becomes the cornerstone of a new world.

Movements requires action not discussions. It is not dialogue that creates movement, but actions that creates a new dialogue. That new dialogue is very distinct and carries within it the seeds of the new movement. Dialogue by itself tends to be circular in nature and carries no potency to break through the old thinking; the only way to break through from the old is to take a new action.

Movements are visionary.They offer society a desired future. People are attracted by the prospect of a sudden and spectacular change in their condition of life. Movement sees right through the present and imagines a new future. It is written that Jesus endured the cross and shame for the joy set before Him. His vision of the future was so magnificent that it helped him deal with the present sacrifice.

Movements are prophetic.They call people to higher standard of life. They call for justice and order and equality. They call us to do justice, love mercy and walk humbly. A prophetic vision believes despite of the evidence to the contrary. It does not succumb to the pabulum of emotional self pity or the arrogance of the self-made man. It calls us to higher standard, one that elevates us above the mundane and provokes us to live a transcendent life in the transient world.

The Power of Biblical Connectedness

In 2002 we started an organization called Glocal.net that focused on starting churches. It would change and morph to ultimately what we have become today – but it was a journey. We didn’t plan to start a network organization, we had just started a lot of churches and many of them wanted a way to gather and network. It quickly grew very large and far beyond my administrative ability and became several groups. I had no desire to start or run a “mini-denomination!” As a matter of fact, I did very little with GlocalNet for years. As a church, however, we kept on starting more churches and by default GlocalNet grew.  I could see the value of all of us coming together – but our first response to the way we were relating was very western and industrial.  We came together around three things we all did – and still do:  (1) start churches, (2) work with the poor in our city, and (3) work in hard places in the world.  This brought around all kinds of people from charismatic to reformed to Baptist and even a few Anglicans. We had so many stories. I knew God was doing something different, but I responded the only way I knew how — in an old western, task-driven, organizational wineskins. 

As I began to travel the world I had the extraordinary opportunity to come to know and learn from many global pastors who lead significant movements.  We would call their what they’re a part of “church planting movements” (cpms), but most of them would not be familiar with that kind of language. These leaders taught me a new way of coming together as family.

This doesn’t mean that principles are not real or do not matter. The difference is that in the global church, they don’t start with principles, they start with people.  The people are first.  You can go to many conferences now and hear someone lecture or speak of how to start a movement and what it takes: a catalytic leader, a winsome message, a complimentary team, multiple evangelist to promote the movement – and on and on and on.  Inevitably, people without movements begin to use the language of movements to get people to join a movement that doesn’t exist.  We are missing something.

What we are missing is the Biblical Concept of Family. The global pastors I’ve met do not talk about movements or networks. Instead, when they talk about the church, they speak of their family and of their spiritual sons and daughters.  In many of these places around the world it’s impossible to have big meetings and gather thousands of people to hear your message.  You can only grow through relationships. Here, we often join movements through hearing preachers preach about their networks or movements.  A family requires a lifetime of relationships and a lifetime of relational work, not simply a staff and an organizational chart.  This is much more than a language shift.

As I have worked with pastors over the years, I’ve discovered they join groups for the purpose of identity or mission.  You can tell the identity groups because they have robust statements of beliefs, certain teachings, and doctrine you must agree on.  Teaching, for them, is huge because it’s critical to make sure everyone is on the same page.  With mission groups, story is the critical factor.  This is so and so and this is what happened . . . God opened this door, etc.  All organizations and tribes have a certain measure of doctrine and story but each will lean stronger in one way or the other.  This distinction is important to know and understand because it will give you the ethos and direction and values of a particular network, tribe or organization.

But here is what I’ve learned.  Most young pastors join a group because they are really looking for family.  They don’t want organizational ladders or organizational stats – they want family and they need Fathers.  This is very hard for us as Americans. Our history as a nation, our culture, our rugged (if not sinful) individualism makes family hard – but make no mistake about it – we all long for and need family.

Here’s something else that’s important to consider as a leader in this shift, people want to touch people, not worship a new king.  I’m always amazed by how these global movement leaders are so  accessible to the people.  They are not like American mega-church pastors at all.  They are humble, they are normal, you couldn’t pick them out of the crowd.  Often their clothes don’t match and they’re missing teeth! 

Finally, a family has a certain DNA – ours is Kingdom/Disciple/Society/Church.  We all share that same DNA.  It’s in our blood. We believe Jesus is leader of the Kingdom and his teachings are foundational on the Kingdom.  We define disciple as hear and obey.  We believe the grid we engage is our society through domains in the public square.  We believe the church isn’t just a worship service but a small group, a congregation, and a global church.  We build our everything around those four strands. 

When you start operating as family everything changes.  I’m having more fun in ministry today than ever before because pretty much everything I do, I do it with young people alongside of me. I’m trying to raise up a family.  I love working with world leaders at this stage in my life, but I don’t do it alone any more.  I often take a young pastor beside me, mentoring them in diplomacy, protocol, culture, or whatever is necessary at that moment. From the credibility we’ve earned over our lives we gain far more access than we had when we were young which leads to many more opportunities.  As we get older it is critical that we share our access and opportunities as we mentor young sons and daughters so when we’re gone the family and the ministry continue. 

If you want to know what our family is like, you’re welcome to join us at our Family Gathering.

 

The Original Design – God’s Household

The church by divine design is patently and functionally the family or household of God. Adam the first man was referred to in Luke’s genealogy as the son of God. If the church is the family of God then it should function as a family. Herein lies the present problems confronting the church. While the notion that the church is the family of God is generally accepted by most denominational tradition of Christendom its practical outworking is largely foreign to the bible. It has strayed from God’s divine intention and instead has developed into an institution of religion, encumbered by an excessive amount of regulations and practices. Consequently, since the church has abdicated it’s fundamental purpose the earth is plagued with dysfunction that can only be broken by a fresh inquiry into scriptures concerning the church’s essential structure and apostolic mission. We need to address the question of God’s Household and the need for apostolic fathers who will selflessly raise up sons of God to steward the Kingdom of God thereby establishing the sovereign rule of peace in creation. God’s desire is the strategic placement of mature sons into the influential places in the world so that the nations of this earth may be reconciled to Him resulting in peace and goodwill among men.

The first and major key that we must address is how we relate to each other.

A family is by nature an organism not an organization. It offers relationships instead of rules and regulations; connections instead of separation; community instead of conformity. God’s plan when He created the world was to extend His rule on this earth through families; through father and mother having sons and daughters, thereby filling the earth. Sin however came into the world and the results were broken and fractured relationships. However, God never abandoned His original plan and sent His Son, the second Adam to redeem, reconcile and restore us back to his original plan; the family of God. Jesus came to restore us back to the Father and to reconcile the family to each other. Fatherhood and family are the dominant themes of the New Testament. If we miss that we automatically end with systems to replace relationships.

The second key in a family is the issue of DNA. Families are built on a common DNA.

DNA informs the organism of its characteristics and helps shape it into that which resembles the family. Science tells us that the main role of DNA is the long-term storage of information. All cellular life exists and is replicated through DNA. However, organizations by nature tend to grow and multiply by maintaining structures, policies or belief system. However, a family grows and multiplies through life giving relationships in an environment of mutual love for each other; a common mission that flows through the blood stream not the corporate manual. Northwood Church gave birth to Glocalnet; a family of churches that is committed to building according to God’s blueprint; His Kingdom, disciples that hear and obey His voice, focused on the reconciliation of all things and discovering the church in all domains of society. Breaking out of the walls of church buildings and engaging with the public square; bringing the reality of the Kingdom of God to bear upon every domain of society. Relentlessly pursuing peace and reconciliation among all people in all places for all things. We are committed to building according to God’s original design; His blueprint not ours.

 


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