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Loving Our City

by Kevin Brown  of  The Perfecting Church, Sewell NJ

Guest Blogger

Three things have been undeniably clear since our earliest days as a worshipping community just over three and a half years ago.  This video captures how the community responds when the church becomes a verb and goes as disciples that serve their neighbors with their jobs and passions.

Church is not a noun. Church is a verb.

In far too many cases church is a noun to those who attend, those who once attended and those who have never attended.  The building and the traditions that take place in the building are what define the church.  We invite people to come and see, believing that the key to transformation in our community is getting people to come to our noun — to see our person, place or thing. But the truth of the matter is church is not a noun. It has to be a verb.  We can’t be known solely for trying to get people to come.  We have to be known primarily for going.  We concluded if we were going to plant a church it had to be one filled with people known for going.  Not simply going to a building but going to our neighbors, meeting needs and becoming part of the solution.  We must be a verb, individually and collectively.

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My Journey Into A Multi-Ethnic Church Community

By Sam Chacko, Pastor, LOFT City Church

My parents migrated to the United States when I was just three years old.  When they first arrived in Philadelphia, they were part of a church plant that was just a few years old and primarily focused on the immigrant Indian community.  I grew up in that church and saw her grow from a handful of blue-collar immigrant workers to a fairly large congregation.  I have been incredibly blessed by the passion of the Indian Christian community in which I was raised, and their faith and risk-taking challenged me as I grew up and began to pursue ministry.  When I entered seminary, my dream was to go back to the Indian community and work with the second and third generation community – a community raised and educated in the United States. They spoke English fluently (often instead of our native language) and obtained degrees from the finest of universities as well as great jobs. They love baseball, basketball and football.  Their kids are actively involved in sports leagues and school activities.  One could argue they were more American than Indian.  Read more